Created on 18 July 2014
Published Date
AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Dan Travers and Billy Gilliland 1986 mens doubles goldWe’re nearly there.  The good news this week is that Scotland is seeded fifth in the team event so a place in Saturday’s quarter-finals is well within grasp.

As the Glasgow Games come into view my own thoughts have returned to Edinburgh 1986. There are so many memories – good, bad and ugly.

The best, of course, was Billy Gilliland and Dan Travers winning gold at Meadowbank in the men’s doubles. The final was late in the evening and a close match against Nigel Tier and Andy Goode.

And it was the home crowd that definitely helped swing it Scotland’s way. Tier showed his disgust at the vociferous support – and that made the fans cheer even louder. The Englishman let it get under his skin and our boys reaped the benefits.

 

Dan Travers and Billy Gilliland 1986 mens doubles goldWe’re nearly there. The good news this week is that Scotland is seeded fifth in the team event so a place in Saturday’s quarter-finals is well within grasp.

As the Glasgow Games come into view my own thoughts have returned to Edinburgh 1986. There are so many memories – good, bad and ugly.

The best, of course, was Billy Gilliland and Dan Travers winning gold at Meadowbank in the men’s doubles. The final was late in the evening and a close match against Nigel Tier and Andy Goode.

And it was the home crowd that definitely helped swing it Scotland’s way. Tier showed his disgust at the vociferous support – and that made the fans cheer even louder. The Englishman let it get under his skin and our boys reaped the benefits.

Gilliland and Christine Heatly took a bronze medal in the mixed doubles to add to the delight in the individual events.

By contrast, the team event ended in disaster. In with a medal chance, Alison Fulton suffered a horrendous knee injury in one of the final group matches. It was horrible to watch – if I remember correctly the moment of doom was accompanied by a scream – and poor Alison was removed from Meadowbank in a wheelchair. It was bye, bye to team success. 

Twenty-eight years on and here we are in a similar situation. A chance of a medal in the team event and high hopes of podium places in the individual section.

The big difference this time is the positive attitude of everyone involved. In Edinburgh, the Games were riddled by negative stories, including political boycotts and financial mismanagement. This time, the PR people have been out in force. It’s a well-oiled machine.

But, for me personally, it will tale a lot for Glasgow 2014 to outdo Edinburgh 1986. Dan and Billy’s win – including being showered in champagne by Mr Travers at the end of the match – stands out as one of the top three experiences of my 30 year journalistic career. 

But I am hoping that the forthcoming 11 days will bring some more never-to-be-forgotten moments.  Come on Scotland!

 

ophtalmologues à riverside en Californie viagra le procès orson welles

g2014-home
g2014-profiles
g2014-news
g2014-externalpress
g2014-schedule
g2014-blog

Home   Home PageElspeth's Games blog The good, bad and ugly of Edinburgh 1986